History of Wrestling
bobdahlstrom:

I know most people would have picked Mr. Perfect for a match with Ziggler, so I went with someone you probably wouldn’t expect. But now that you’re thinking about it, These two would put on one hell of an entertaining match, right?

bobdahlstrom:

I know most people would have picked Mr. Perfect for a match with Ziggler, so I went with someone you probably wouldn’t expect. But now that you’re thinking about it, These two would put on one hell of an entertaining match, right?

29 July 2014
28 July 2014

Monday Night RAW #27 - 26.07.1993

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Venue: Manhattan Center, Manhattan, NY
Crowd: 1200
Taped: 19.07.1993
Show Length: 47:14
Total Wrestling: 26:00 / 55%
TV Rating: 3.0

Hosts are Vince McMahon, Randy Savage and Bobby HeenanSavage is warned by Doink the Clown to stay out of his match tonight. Vince points out Stu and Helen Hart in attendance.

Bam Bam Bigelow vs. Bret Hart

This is a rematch of the King of the Ring final, and the pair have also wrestled around the horn for much of the spring so should be able to have a good match together in their sleep. There’s no opening shine for Bret as Bigelow just hammers him out of the gate but Bret comes firing back with punches. Bret’s punches were hugely underrated. He always threw a great one, but because he was so technically skilled people tend to forget about it. Throwing a solid worked punch is one of the keys to being a good worker, or at least substituting it with something else if you suck at them, like the 123 Kid with his kicks or Rob Van Dam and his forearm strikes.

Bigelow takes over again and the pacing slows down. He’s not giving Bret as much here as he did at the King of the Ring, or even against Marty Jannetty a few weeks ago on RAW. he certainly seems to have different degrees of caring, but then there are very few wrestlers who give it 100% all of the time. He does seem to be at at his best when he’s taking the bumps here, like he’s eager to prove he can hang with Bret in that respect. 

Even when Bigelow goofs and lands his dropkick low, around the gut, Bret still has the perfect sell for it. Bret comes back with those great punches, then suckers him into the Princess Bride sleeper, with Bigelow escaping by running Bret’s face into the top buckle. Bret comes back again with a bulldog which, sleeper aside, might be his first wrestling hold tonight. He goes for the Sharpshooter but out comes Jerry Lawler to get words with Stu and Helen Hart. Stu’s mumbling is terrific. It’s almost a rib. “Where were you-ah, when he-ah won the King O’ the Ring?” “Why don’t you put your false teeth in backwards and eat yourself to death?” responds Lawler. Helen’s retort is telling him to shut up and wrestle. While all of this is going on, Bigelow puts a beating on a distracted Bret, all while looking suitably pissed off to be considered secondary to the ‘King’.

Lawler’s presence must be super distracting for the guys in the ring, and indeed, they suffer two major miscues before Bret gets sick of it and bails out after a DDT, getting himself counted out in the process as he sets after a departing Lawler. The match was okay enough but it took a total back seat to the antics in the crowd, which begs the question why they bothered booking a 15+ minute match if the only real purpose was the distraction from Lawler?

Time: 16:04 / Final Rating: **3/4

- Video Control takes us to the SummerSlam Report with 'Mean' Gene Okerlund, who’s big news is that Lex Luger is only getting his title shot at Yokozuna under the condition that Luger must wear padding on his steel forearm. Not only that but Undertaker vs. Giant Gonzalez is now a “Rest in Peace” match, which only Undertaker knows the rules of. That rather skews it in his favour don’t you think?

Mr. Hughes vs. Russ Greenberg

Greenberg has one of the better looks in the jobber brigade, even if he’s a bit camp. He’s a better talent than Mr. Hughes anyway. Quite why the WWF kept insisting on sticking him on RAW is anybody’s guess. Punishment for something I did in a previous life would be my guess. The only fun I have during this one is watching drunk New Yorkers dancing to chants of “Und-er-tay-ker”. Hughes plods through his moves at quarter speed and should finish with a powerbomb because it’s a bloody good finisher, but he doesn’t even bother with a pin attempt. This makes me angry. Greenberg runs into a sidewalk slam moments later for the real finish. 

Time: 3:04 / Final Rating: 1/2*

The Smoking Gunns vs. Dwayne Gill & Glenn Ruth

The Gunns get fed another jobber team after having fun demolishing the last pair of scrubs (I’m thinking 17th May – Ruth & Vadja). Gill and Ruth is an all-star jobber team. Often the best jobbers in their given tag teams. The Gunns double team Ruth while Savage cryptically describes them as “real pistols”. Bart works a little stiff and delivers a cracking knee drop. It’s in slow motion but the accuracy is a thing of beauty. Glen Ruth’s forehead does not like it. Heenan refers to him “Dr. Ruth’s punk kid”. Ruth gets backdropped into the piledriver, which confirms they intended to do that last time, or perhaps they just switched it because it killed the last time out. Bart takes it a lot slower as to not murder his opponent this week.

Time: 4:22 / Final Rating: *

Interview Time: This is pre-recorded as Vince interviews Lex Luger earlier today. Luger talks about how “all this began” here in New York, although his grass roots campaign has lasted barely a month. He claims the arm pad is fine and he has no beef with that stipulation. Vince says he’d like to ask some tough questions in the coming weeks. Hmm, like why did you suddenly stop being a narcissistic jerk and come out waving the American flag overnight? He promises the Lex Express will continue to roll. Softball stuff from Vince and Luger didn’t come across very convincing as a babyface.

Doink the Clown vs. Phil Apollo

The portly Apollo shouldn’t put up much resistance. He looks like a short Don Muraco. Superfan Vladimir gets camera time to point out that Doink is “number one”. I’ve seen Vladimir a lot at these Manhattan tapings. Doink takes Apollo down and wrestles the hell out of him. “There’s nothing funny about Doink. He’s an evil, evil, evil man. Evil clown” – Vince McMahon. He then, without hesitating, points out he’ll be quizzing Lex Luger about steroids in the coming weeks. Holy shit! Really? I’d love to see him on a lie detector for that interview. Hell, put both of them on lie detectors. That’d make for some sweaty television. Doink finishes with the Whoopie Cushion before turning to the “Macho Boy”. Doink’s “Oh Yeah!” is superb. He challenges Savage to get in the ring one-on-one next week. Another Doink appears in the ring and a third one in the stands, and all three laugh us off the air.

Time: 2:30 / Final Rating: *

———

THE RAW RECAP

Most Entertaining
: Doink. Had fun with his squash but really owned on the mic afterwards. 

Least Entertaining: Mr. Hughes. I’m really struggling to find anything to say about his matches now, even negative things.

Quote of the Night: “That gives a whole new meaning to the word headbutt” – Bobby Heenan after Bret Hart butts Bigelow in the lower back area.

Match of the Night: Bret Hart vs. Bam Bam Bigelow

Verdict: This was a nothing show. It helped to set up Doink-Savage next week but if Repo-Savage is anything to go by that’s not a positive. Doink was on a roll in 1993 and got rewarded for it by wrestling Bret Hart at SummerSlam. The match wasn’t up to much and the WWF seemed to go cool on the character afterwards. Half of this entire show was Bret-Bigelow, which merely served to set up Bret-Lawler, and took 25-minutes to do so. 

Rating: 28

———

image


The team at HistoryOfWrestling.info who brought you The Complete WWF Video Guide series are back with this companion piece taking you through the first year of the WWF/WWE’s flagship show: Monday Night RAW!

We cover every angle, segment and match in detail and offer plenty of insight and interesting facts along the way.

Learn about:

  • Friar Ferguson’s ill-fated debut!
  • The 123 Kid’s shocking upset victory!
  • Lex Luger’s sudden babyface turn!
  • Vince McMahon’s hatred for Barney the Dinosaur ticket scalpers!
  • The awful Rob Bartlett!
  • Future Superstars who were still Jobbers to the Stars!
  • Randy Savage’s vicious shoot rant about Hulk Hogan!
  • Brutus Beefcake’s parents!
  • The wrestling blowjob!
  • Much, much more!

104 pages!

Written and presented in the usual History of Wrestling style, with various awards, match and show listings, and a host of star ratings for fans to debate at will.

Click to order in paperback from Lulu.com!

Click to order on Kindle from Amazon!

27 July 2014

March 20th, 1999: Raven vs. Kaz Hayashi

Kaz Hayashi cripples himself for you pleasure on third-string WCW show Worldwide in one of the best four-minute matches you’ll ever see.

26 July 2014
25 July 2014
24 July 2014

The Hart Foundation vs. The Rockers

 - This review has been reprinted with permission from the History of Wrestling book Superstar Series: The Hart Foundation.

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[30/03/1991 - SWS/WWF WrestleFest, Tokyo Dome, Tokyo, Japan]

This is something of a rarity, coming as it does from the WrestleFest event at Tokyo’s Egg Dome baseball stadium, a combined supercard put together by the WWF in conjunction with the Super World of Sports promotion out of Japan. For the uninitiated, SWS was essentially a money-mark promotion founded in 1990 by Hachiro Tanaka, an executive of Japanese eyeglass manufacturing group Megane Super. Armed with top star Genichiro Tenryu and a string of for All Japan Pro Wrestling and New Japan Pro Wrestling names, the group cut a deal in October with Vince McMahon to bring WWF talent to its cards in order to supplant the American names it initially featured, notably the likes of Bob Orton, Jr., the Samoan Swat Team (later the Headshrinkers) and a young Jeff Jarrett.

The working relationship between the two outfits led to top WWF names like Hulk Hogan, Ric Flair and the Ultimate Warrior flying in for major matches, while underutilised names like Haku began to find regular work in Japan as the WWF looked to raise brand awareness in the Orient (the group would go on to run its own four-date Japanese tour in 1994 with assistance from Tenryu’s SWS offshoot/replacement WAR, which proved an unsuccessful venture.)

Naturally, since this event was taped for broadcast on Japanese television, the commentary comes in Japanese, provided here by Ryo Itsuno, Takashi Kikuchi, Shinpei Hayashi, and WWF representative Akio Sato, who until late 1990 had been part of the Orient Express with (Pat) Tanaka, and would return in 1995 to manage Hakushi (Jinsei Shinzaki) under the Shinja moniker. And while I did earlier note this match as being something of a rarity, WWE were good enough to include the outing (albeit in degenerated form) on its Greatest Rivalries: Shawn Michaels vs. Bret Hart DVD and Blu-ray release in 2011, which rather helpfully (and amusingly) comes complete with subtitles, making for a very unique way to watch a pro wrestling match.

It seems like WWE’s production team had some fun with the translations too, Japanese monster movie style, with some very literal interpretations of the ringside analysis. The announcers start by noting that the Rockers debuted for SWS back in January, and that the Hart’s match with Demolition in Philadelphia (their 2/3 falls scrap at SummerSlam) is still fresh in the minds of the Japanese fans. Commentators on a WWF match in 1991 recalling recent history? How bizarre! There’s also a reference to (an admittedly dead) rival promotion, coupled with some terrific Japanglish: “(The Rockers) became AWA World Tag Team Champions in 1987 and 1988. And in late 1988, they made it to the WWF’s Triple Crown Match. They are the kings of tag!” The kings of tag? What, the school playground game? And what on earth is “the WWF’s Triple Crown Match” anyway? The comedy continues as Shinpei-san notes “They look like fighting guppies” and suggests they “move like a coupled mirror.”

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The match follows a similar structure to the one from Madison Square Garden in November 1989, which I only bring up as that match is also on the Greatest Rivalries release, making it much more noticeable when viewed back-to-back. Neidhart’s hellacious double clothesline still gets a big pop, but this being Japan, the crowd aren’t particularly as rabid as a crowd in the US may appear to be. Shawn takes a gigantic backdrop from Neidhart which impresses the hell out of everyone, but the announcers seem to start taking potshots at US wrestling, noting that bearhugs are common in that culture. Mate, just stick around for the IRS: The Chinlock Years!

Neidhart whips Shawn into the corner, bringing about more hilarious translation tomfoolery; “He’s giving up on the physical confrontation! We’re seeing bewildering tactics on both sides!” Bewildering commentary more like, as despite there being four announcers stationed ringside, they keep pestering Sato for clarification on who is who, and reiterating that this is, in fact, the Hart Foundation vs. the Rockers. It’s kind of like when you have to suffer through English-speaking commentators who can’t be bothered to learn the names of any Japanese wrestlers. Itsuno even gets Bret and Neidhart muddled up, like he’s the ghost of Rod Tronguard.

“Both guys are on the floor!” belts out Itsuno during a Bret and Shawn double down. “It’s a lose-lose situation!” Indeeeed. “The Rockers are overcome with nervousness. They’re trying to turn the Big Egg into a Big Cake!” If only that were literal. They trade off on some more reversals and, according to the commentary “the best wrestlers are challenging each other”, which might well be true but comes across like a bit of an insulting way to say Neidhart and Jannetty aren’t as good as their partners. Bret puts his head down and Shawn goes for a sunset flip, or to put it another way, “he’s challenging him with a spin!” Unfortunately for our Shawn, “his belly is a little bit sweaty”, so he only scores a two-count.

Eventually, all four guys make it back inside the ring, leading to a nifty sequence that ends with Shawn landing a crossbody on Bret, only for Bret to reverse it into a cradle for the pin at 14:38. I know Bret spent time in New Japan years earlier (as noted by the announcers) and was the biggest star of the four guys in this match, but to this day I’m still not sure why the Harts went over here given that their team was all but finished by this point and the Rockers were the ones most likely to come back to Japan (Shawn in fact would tour somewhat regularly with SWS following his heel turn on Jannetty.)

Good match, though with the quiet Japanese crowd and the echo of the cavernous Dome setting, it all felt a little bit stifled, and the slightly truncated nature of things is another knock against. Still, a disappointment for these two teams is like a career best for some, and it was nice to see these guys working against one another in a different environment than usual.

Final Rating: ***1/2

———

image

Superstar Series: The Hart Foundation

The most comprehensive, in-depth guide to legendary WWF tag team The Hart Foundation ever published, this book features full reviews of over 150 Hart Foundation matches, the majority of which are exclusive to this guide!

From PPV to TV to house shows and everything in between, every available bout featuring this dynamic duo is covered in our trademark History of Wrestling style!

As well as chronological match reviews, there are also the usual star ratings, random musings, facts, and behind-the-scenes information. Not only that, but there is also an exhaustive and exclusive list of every Hart Foundation match known to have ever taken place.

A must have for all fans of the team! 106 pages!

• Over 150 Hart Foundation matches!
• Complete reviews and star ratings!
• Behind the scenes information!
• Complete chronology of the team!
• All PPVs, TV and house shows!
• Exclusive content!

Click to order from Lulu.com!

Click to order on Kindle from Amazon!

———

www.historyofwrestling.info
www.twitter.com/HOWwrestling

23 July 2014
22 July 2014
21 July 2014

Monday Night RAW #26 - 19.07.1993

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Venue: Manhattan Center, Manhattan, NY
Crowd: 1200
Taped: 19.07.1993
Show Length: 47:18
Total Wrestling: 19:15 / 40.7%
TV Rating2.9

We start with the Lex Express and Lex Luger talking about his love of the USA. He’s coming to save the motherfuckin’ day, yeah! Hosts are Vince McMahon, Randy Savage and Bobby Heenan.

WWF Intercontinental Title: Shawn Michaels (c) vs. Marty Jannetty

Vince reminds us that Jannetty beat Shawn for the strap on RAW two months ago, which is part of the reason why Shawn recruited a bodyguard in Diesel. Because Jannetty has won this match before, the fans are excited at the prospect of lightning striking twice. Poor Marty, he’s just weeks away from a career-derailing destruction job at the hands of Ludvig Borga. I’d call it a waste of talent but Jannetty wasted his own talent many times over, sadly.

Marty flips out of everything Shawn brings and goes for multiple flash pins as that’s how he won the belt before. They work some wonderful counters with Michaels getting progressively more frustrated that Jannetty dodges all his best stuff. Shawn makes a point of throwing himself into spots with reckless abandon. Most people just can’t do that. It takes a special kind of person to throw their body around in that fashion. Jannetty isn’t quite at Shawn’s level, which he was back in May. He upsets Shawn with a surprise DDT but Shawn’s foot is on the rope and Diesel has to jump in to tell Earl Hebner he screwed up a three-count. Heenan shows Earl the replay during the ad break and when we return the match is back on.

Jannetty gets a sleeper as Shawn hasn’t been able to cope with Jannetty’s enthusiasm. Shawn gets out and it’s Marty’s turn to take a big bump through the ropes. Another ad break sees Shawn take over after a cheap shot through the ropes. Unfortunately they come back with Shawn hooking a chinlock. That’s supposed to be for during the ad break guys. The commentators put over how much effort has gone into this match and both guys, when paired up with suitable opponents, bring that massive effort. Shawn goes for a big powerbomb only for Marty to counter into a huracanrana for a huge near fall, with Vince getting suitably excited.

Jannetty rolls through a crossbody for another energetic near fall. This has become a real barnburner. Jannetty goes big on the ropes but crashes and burns. Diesel picks him up, throws him back inside and Shawn throws an arm over him for the pin, retaining the title thanks to his bodyguard’s help and Jannetty’s stupidity. Another great TV match between these two, thoush sadly for Jannetty, they’d go in opposite directions from here. Jannetty just wasn’t in the WWF’s long-term plans because of his unreliability, while Shawn would go on to become the kingpin ‘Showstopper’.

Time: 14:20 / Final Rating: ****1/4

- Interview Time: Money, Inc. Vince riles them up immediately by mentioning they lost the titles to the Steiner Brothers. IRS talks about how everybody cheats on their taxes. Get some new material, for crying out loud. Talk about stuck in a rut! DiBiase switches gears to barrack Razor Ramon for losing to the 123 Kid, which brings Razor out to retort. DiBiase offers him a job as a domestic to compensate for losing his $10,000 but Razor takes offence at DiBiase’s tone and lays them both out, which would lead to a freshly turned Razor facing DiBiase at SummerSlam. DiBiase challenges the Kid to prove to Razor what a joke he is.

Men on a Mission vs. Rich Myers & Hank Harris

An example of Oscar’s terrible rapping: “Whose number one? Men on a Mish-un!” Sick rhymes, man. Poor Rich Myers, he always gets fed to the nastiest opponents. Mabel squashes him, literally, while Vince gets orgasmic about his physique. Harris is a bigger guy with a pudgy body but Mabel makes him look tiny, then Oscar gets in the way of the finish, proving himself completely useless. Mabel basically just falls on Harris for the win.

Time: 1:45 / Final Rating: DUD

- Video Control goes to 'Mean' Gene and the SummerSlam Report, where he’s dancing to Men on a Mission’s them music. Now I hate them even more. He mentions the Undertaker vs. Giant Gonzalez has been signed, along with Luger’s title challenge of Yokozuna. Yep, it’s another bad 1993 card, folks.

- Video Control is kept busy by Vince, who throws to the Lex Express. Luger is travelling the country in a hideous AMERICABUS to drum up grass roots support for his title shot. I love that the bus has an ICOPRO advert on it. They were just obsessed with trying to sell people that junk in 1993.

Bastion Booger vs. Scott Despres

I differ greatly in my opinion of Mike Shaw as compared with fellow History of Wrestling scribe James Dixon, who seems to think he was decent in Stampede Wrestling. I thought he sucked and that Makhan Singh was one of the least-important guys in that whole territory. Booger might be his worst gimmick, though that’s sadly debatable. It does allow him to showcase how fat he is, but that’s about it. Poor Despres gets totally squashed here. Normally I wouldn’t rate squash matches but this one was offensively bad, and a complete waste of time.

Time: 1:00 / Final Rating: DUD

- The King’s Court: In the WWF’s continuing attempts to latch on to anybody with even just a modicum of celebrity status, Jerry Lawler's guest this week is 60s novelty act Tiny Tim, a ukulele player who did a famously creepy high-pitched cover of Tiptoe Through the Tulips. The WWF: their finger 30 years off the pulse. Lawler requests a few bars of …Tulips but thankfully cuts him off. Tim plays the whole thing straight but the crowd totally turn on the segment with a big “We want Bret!” chant. Tim tells Lawler he’s not a Burger King but rather a Dairy Queen, and Lawler doesn’t even sock him in the jaw, rendering the entire segment useless. He does smash up the ukulele though, reducing Tim to tears. I was begging for a piledriver here, but alas, one never came.

123 Kid vs. Chris Duffy

Duffy looks like a goofy cross between Bob Backlund and Shane Douglas. Ted DiBiase returns to scout the Kid who unloads with kicks, but Razor Ramon returns to watch the Kid’s back. This is actually the first time on RAW that the Kid has had a flat-out jobber to work with, so it’s the first time he’s been able to really exhibit his best moves. That is at least until Duffy overpowers him. Overpowered by a jobber. Tragic. Strength never was the Kid’s game. He clocks Duffy with a spin kick and leg jams the back of his head for the win.

Time: 2:10 / Final Rating: *1/4

———

THE RAW RECAP

Most Entertaining: Shawn Michaels.

Least Entertaining: Oscar. The worst thing to happen to rap in wrestling, ever.

Quote of the Night: “I’ll show Mr. Machismo what a real man can do” – Ted DiBiase sticks it to Razor Ramon.

Match of the Night: Shawn Michaels vs. Marty Jannetty.

Verdict: The show started incredibly with Shawn and Marty, and the Kid squash at the end was ok. Everything in the middle was horrible. What did the Tiny Tim thing achieve? Jerry Lawler was already over with a bunch of cheap heat, he didn’t need more. The crowd just wanted Bret Hart to come out and kick Lawler’s ass. It boggles the mind that the same company put on Shawn and Marty in a MOTYC to open the show then followed it with the Tiny Tim nonsense. That’s the WWF for you. It’s a constant battle to actually get good wrestling. In order to get there you have to wade through all the crap.

Rating: 46

———

image


The team at HistoryOfWrestling.info who brought you The Complete WWF Video Guide series are back with this companion piece taking you through the first year of the WWF/WWE’s flagship show: Monday Night RAW!

We cover every angle, segment and match in detail and offer plenty of insight and interesting facts along the way.

Learn about:

  • Friar Ferguson’s ill-fated debut!
  • The 123 Kid’s shocking upset victory!
  • Lex Luger’s sudden babyface turn!
  • Vince McMahon’s hatred for Barney the Dinosaur ticket scalpers!
  • The awful Rob Bartlett!
  • Future Superstars who were still Jobbers to the Stars!
  • Randy Savage’s vicious shoot rant about Hulk Hogan!
  • Brutus Beefcake’s parents!
  • The wrestling blowjob!
  • Much, much more!

104 pages!

Written and presented in the usual History of Wrestling style, with various awards, match and show listings, and a host of star ratings for fans to debate at will.

Click to order in paperback from Lulu.com!

Click to order on Kindle from Amazon!

20 July 2014
19 July 2014
18 July 2014
17 July 2014

WWF Tag Team Titles, Best 2/3 Falls: Demolition (c) vs. The Hart Foundation

This review has been reprinted with permission from the History of Wrestling book Superstar Series: The Hart Foundation.

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[27/08/1990 - SummerSlam, The Spectrum, Philadelphia, PA]


First Fall: All three members of Demolition are in the building, but it’s only Smash and Crush who come out to wrestle with the angle being that the Harts are the established duo, therefore dominating the early going, while the addition of Crush and the banishment from ringside of Ax has actually weakened Demolition due to the unfamiliarity between Smash and Crush. Crush of course still gets to boss chunks of the match by himself because he’s young and big, traits Vince McMahon just loves in his WWF superstars.

Bret meanwhile takes the opportunity to show what an excellent all-rounder he is, wrestling circles around Crush. Both teams make a reasonable number of tags to keep the action fresh, but the Harts lean heavily on Bret’s abilities as he’s just starting to get the “Five Moves of Doom” over. Demolition double team him though and the Demolition Decapitation puts the defending champions up 1-0.

Second Fall: Demolition kick things off by isolating the already-hurting Bret, whose selling here is typically excellent. He was so consistent in the ring, and he was striving to improve his mic skills ahead of his upcoming singles push. He eventually gets the hot tag to Neidhart, causing a seismic shift in the dynamic of the match. Neidhart is all about the power and single-handedly drags his team back into it. The Harts then look to finish it with the Hart Attack only for Crush to intentionally bump referee Earl Hebner, who calls a DQ to level the score at 1-1.

Third Fall: Ax runs down to hide under the ring as the fall gets underway, with the Harts again demonstrating their superior teaming until Ax sneaks in and beats Bret down. How can Hebner not tell the difference here? Ax has totally different face paint and a different body to Smash and Crush. It’s not even like a Killer Bees level of switching possibilities. Eventually the Legion of Doom get sick of all the switching and come out to retrieve Ax from under the ring, setting up their natural house show program for the autumn and winter months.

With Ax and Smash busy on the outside brawling with the LOD, Crush gets rolled up and the Harts take the titles. It was an interesting switch in that neither team really needed the belts, although it seems like the WWF were lining up Power and Glory for a run with the belts and needed a strong babyface team for them to take the straps from, in order to build up a Power & Glory vs. LOD feud for WrestleMania VII. That plan fell partially by the wayside once the WWF signed the Nasty Boys away from WCW and Neidhart almost got released, resulting in the WWF switching the titles to the Rockers in a Saturday Night’s Main Event match which never made air when the top ring rope broke, the 90-minute broadcast was recut into a 60-minute The Main Event prime time special, and Neidhart was rehired in the interim. The upshot of the “phantom title switch” led to Shawn Michaels accusing Bret of playing politics by not dropping the belts, but in reality Bret was desperate to ditch the titles so he could get his singles run.

Final Rating: 
***1/4

———

image

Superstar Series: The Hart Foundation

The most comprehensive, in-depth guide to legendary WWF tag team The Hart Foundation ever published, this book features full reviews of over 150 Hart Foundation matches, the majority of which are exclusive to this guide!

From PPV to TV to house shows and everything in between, every available bout featuring this dynamic duo is covered in our trademark History of Wrestling style!

As well as chronological match reviews, there are also the usual star ratings, random musings, facts, and behind-the-scenes information. Not only that, but there is also an exhaustive and exclusive list of every Hart Foundation match known to have ever taken place.

A must have for all fans of the team! 106 pages!

• Over 150 Hart Foundation matches!
• Complete reviews and star ratings!
• Behind the scenes information!
• Complete chronology of the team!
• All PPVs, TV and house shows!
• Exclusive content!

Click to order from Lulu.com!

Click to order on Kindle from Amazon!

———

www.historyofwrestling.info
www.twitter.com/HOWwrestling

16 July 2014
bobdahlstrom:

I know I know, this already happened, right? Think about it, all the classic Taker/Savage matches you saw. Wait, now did you really? As hard as it is to believe, these two never had a televised singles match. They wrestled a couple times at house shows, but never televised, so it doesn’t count. And I believe they were in a tag match against each other, but again, I’m not counting it.Think of how awesome this match would have been. I went with a current Undertaker vs Savage before he was super super over the top. Think like WM3 era Savage. Oh man. How great could this have been?

bobdahlstrom:

I know I know, this already happened, right? 

Think about it, all the classic Taker/Savage matches you saw. Wait, now did you really? As hard as it is to believe, these two never had a televised singles match. They wrestled a couple times at house shows, but never televised, so it doesn’t count. And I believe they were in a tag match against each other, but again, I’m not counting it.

Think of how awesome this match would have been. I went with a current Undertaker vs Savage before he was super super over the top. Think like WM3 era Savage. Oh man. How great could this have been?

 
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